MAKING THE OUTSIDER IN

Phillip March Jones is a dedicated and tireless ambassador for outsider art,

that genre of those selftaught makers who have limited contact with and access to commercial galleries and institutions.

Jones was just sixteen years old on a family road trip when he convinced his parents to allow him to visit the rural Georgia home and studio of the Reverend Howard Finster.

Commanded by God to “Make sacred art,” the Reverend had done that in abundance,

MAKING THE OUTSIDER IN and his Talking Heads album covers and talk show appearances had brought the outsider flavor to the mainstream.

A native of Lexington, Kentucky, Jones graduated from Emory University in Atlanta but also attended Auburn in Alabama and the Sorbonne in Paris.

 (His French translating skills helped subsidize some early aesthetic endeavors.)

 In 2009, he started Institute 193, a small project space near the University of Kentucky with the intention of exposing contemporary artists of the interior who were unknown on the coasts.

Two years later he became the inaugural director of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation.

Souls Grown Deep was a labor of love for collector Bill Arnett,

who had a missionary zeal to preserve, document, display, MAKING THE OUTSIDER IN

and promote the expressions of living self-taught African-American artists in the Southeast and elevate them to the level of the blue-chip insiders. He succeeded.

Works from the foundation are now in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

And former director of the Dallas Museum of Art, Maxwell Anderson, is currently the foundation`s president.

Jones’ father grew up on Mayflower Drive in the Oak Cliff neighborhood of Dallas, and his family typically visited Texas twice a year.

He became professionally engaged with the city through his work on the Baron and Budd PC Collection,

the majority of whose artworks are from Texas and the surrounding states.

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